How to fix a hole in wool.

It happens occasionally that a hole may pop up in your woolens for various reasons.  Wool is a knitted fabric and can only handle so much action.  It can snag or the wool moth may find  your wool.  If you notice a hole, you will want to repair it to keep it from spreading further.  Thicker wool is actually easier to repair than thin wool since the fluffier fibers hide repairs better.  Cashmere and ultra fine merino wool are nearly impossible to repair invisibly since they are typically a sleek fabric.   If your damage is caused by moths,  you will first need to rid the wool of any moth eggs that may be hidden in the fibers.  You can put the wool in the freezer for a day to kill anything that may be left in the fibers and then give it a good bath in a sink of warm, soapy water.  This soaker here failed final inspection as we found a small hole in the wool.  It is a merino wool and not very fluffy so it was a little more difficult to repair cleanly.  We recommend the following steps for repairing any wool.

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Or better said, we dare you to find where the hole WAS. This was our soaker after repair and it turned out pretty darn good.

I placed a white sticker on the backside of the hole so you can see where we will be repairing.  We used a matching thread and regular sewing needle.  We cut roughly a 28 inch piece of thread and put it through the eye of the needle which left us with about a 14 inch piece of thread doubled.

I placed a white sticker on the backside of the hole so you can see where we will be repairing. We used a matching thread and regular sewing needle. We cut roughly a 28 inch piece of thread and put it through the eye of the needle which left us with about a 14 inch piece of thread doubled.

Forgive the fuzzy quality here, but you get the idea.  Working on the inside of your piece, take your needle and start on one side of the hole and just barely grab the fibers.  Try not to push your needle through to the outside.  This will keep your repair neat and invisible.

Forgive the fuzzy quality here, but you get the idea. Working on the inside of your piece, take your needle and start on one side of the hole and just barely grab the fibers. Try not to push your needle through to the outside. This will keep your repair neat and invisible.

Notice that I left about a 3 or 4 inch "tail" of thread hanging.  I did not tie a knot in the end of the thread. Why you ask?  I will tell you shortly.   My needle is still attached to the other piece of thread that is out of the photo here.

Notice that I left about a 3 or 4 inch “tail” of thread hanging. I did not tie a knot in the end of the thread. Why you ask? I will tell you shortly. My needle is still attached to the other piece of thread that is out of the photo here.

We continued to work back and forth with our needle and thread closing up the hole.  We barely caught the fiber with the needle and pulled our thread tight along the way.  After we made our way to the end of the hole and everything was closed up nicely, we didn't stop and continued to make stitches working our way back to where we started at the first tail.  Once we made our way back, it was time to cut the needle loose leaving us with 2 tails.

We continued to work back and forth with our needle and thread closing up the hole. We barely caught the fiber with the needle and pulled our thread tight along the way. After we made our way to the end of the hole and everything was closed up nicely, we didn’t stop and continued to make stitches working our way back to where we started at the first tail. Once we made our way back, it was time to cut the needle loose leaving us with 2 tails.

Another fuzzy photo but it is hard to hold everything at the same time ;) This is the final step.... simply take your 2 tails and tie them together snugly which sinks the knot down into the fibers.  We think tying the 2 tails together in this fashion makes a permanent fix.  Wool is often so stretchy that a simple knot in the end of 1 tail will often not hold and will pop through the fibers and you still have the same problem. I usually tie them 2 or 3 times and clip the excess.

Another fuzzy photo here but you will see what I am talking about here.  It is hard to hold onto everything at the same time ;) This is the final step…. simply take your 2 tails and tie them together snugly which sinks the knot down into the fibers. By tying the 2 tails together in this fashion it makes a permanent fix. Wool is often so stretchy that a simple knot in the end of 1 tail will often not hold and will pop through the fibers and you still have the same problem. I usually tie them 2 or 3 times and clip the excess. Turn it right side out and you are done.

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4 thoughts on “How to fix a hole in wool.

  1. I hope you don’t mind me reblogging this on my Learn About wool site… I mentioned you as a direct source and also linked to your wonderful product website too. The information is extremely useful and I know people are going to come right over to you to leave comments and view your website.
    Sara.

  2. I have rarely been so underwhelmed at the quality of the photographs and the advice given. WTF? I’d have more guidance making it up as i went along. Sorry!

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